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4 Myths About Renter’s Insurance

Common Misconceptions If you’re wondering what’s the big deal about renter’s insurance — like you need another way to spend your monthly paycheck? — first consider these common misconceptions: It’s cool — my landlord’s covered. In most cases, a landlord’s insurance covers only structural damage to the building itself—and many landlord policies don’t even go […]

Common Misconceptions

If you’re wondering what’s the big deal about renter’s insurance — like you need another way to spend your monthly paycheck? — first consider these common misconceptions:

It’s cool — my landlord’s covered. In most cases, a landlord’s insurance covers only structural damage to the building itself—and many landlord policies don’t even go that far if the damage is caused by a tenant. If you leave the tub running and it turns your floor into cardboard and dribbles downstairs, damaging your neighbor’s couch, you may be liable for the whole drippy mess. If your building went up in flames, your landlord’s coverage would include repairs, but only to the building, not to the possessions of tenants.

It’s out of my price range. Is $10 to $20 per month too much? In March of 2002, unofficial online quotes from two major carriers produced annual rates of $147 ($12.25 per month) and $203 (under $17 monthly) respectively. Both quotes were for a fictional five-room house in Boulder, Colorado, covering the basics for “standard” personal property valued at $35,700 (the automated figure produced by one company). Both quotes had a deductible of $500 per incident, and included medical coverage for others, on-premise or off-premise. Assumptions were that the house contained a smoke alarm and fire extinguishers. For lower rates, you can raise the deductible; for more protection, you can pay more for replacement cost coverage, in which reimbursement is based on today’s replacement cost rather than original value.

I’m in a great building, and I’m not worried about security. Renter’s insurance extends beyond on-premise theft and hazards. If your suitcase is stolen while you’re on vacation, you’ll likely be covered. Same with property stolen from your car. If you’re prone to barroom brawls—well, you might need more help than renter’s insurance, but you’ll probably be covered if you hurt someone. Speaking of injuries, you’ll also likely be protected if someone slips and sprains their ankle at your annual dance-a-thon; you may even receive compensation for legal defense costs in the case of a lawsuit.

My stuff isn’t really worth much. You might be surprised at how quickly all those books, CDs, and kitchen appliances add up. According to StateFarm.com, most people own more than $20,000 worth of property. Refer to the lists in this article to make an inventory of your possessions prior to contacting an insurance carrier for a quote. Get your Free Quote below.

Types of Coverage

Personal property coverage

As with any insurance policy, coverage varies by state, company, and type, but here are some basic examples of personal property to include in your inventory. Items not listed here may still be insurable; ask agents about customizing your policy with more options.

Property typically covered:

* Stereo systems, VCRs, and television sets
* CDs, DVDs, videos, and tapes
* Cameras and other photography equipment
* Movable appliances, including microwave oven
* Furniture
* Sports equipment
* China and glassware
* Clothing
* Books
* Miscellaneous

Property typically covered with limitations:

* Home computers
* Cash, including coin collections
* Checks, traveler’s checks, and securities
* Jewelry and watches
* Precious and semi-precious stones
* Comic books, trading cards, and stamps, including collections
* Antiques and fine art
* Goldware and silverware (theft)
* Rugs, wall hangings, and tapestries
* Firearms (theft)
* Furs or clothing trimmed in fur
* Boats or other watercraft, and related equipment
Types of Coverage

Personal property coverage

As with any insurance policy, coverage varies by state, company, and type, but here are some basic examples of personal property to include in your inventory. Items not listed here may still be insurable; ask agents about customizing your policy with more options.

Property typically covered:

* Stereo systems, VCRs, and television sets
* CDs, DVDs, videos, and tapes
* Cameras and other photography equipment
* Movable appliances, including microwave oven
* Furniture
* Sports equipment
* China and glassware
* Clothing
* Books
* Miscellaneous

Property typically covered with limitations:

* Home computers
* Cash, including coin collections
* Checks, traveler’s checks, and securities
* Jewelry and watches
* Precious and semi-precious stones
* Comic books, trading cards, and stamps, including collections
* Antiques and fine art
* Goldware and silverware (theft)
* Rugs, wall hangings, and tapestries
* Firearms (theft)
* Furs or clothing trimmed in fur
* Boats or other watercraft, and related equipment

Natural hazards coverage

Again, natural-hazard coverage varies by state and company, but most policies protect your property against losses created by the following:

* Vandalism
* Water damage from failure of plumbing or appliances
* Frozen water pipes
* Hail
* Windstorm
* Smoke
* Explosion
* Vehicles or aircraft

For a higher premium, most insurance carriers offer options to add coverage for hazards not included in a standard renter’s policy:

* Earthquake, landslide, or other damage caused by movement of the earth
* Water damage cause by an underground source or flooding
* Nuclear-hazard damages

Remember that insurance is about your protection against unforeseeable circumstances. Even if you think “it can’t happen here,” paying the price of one music CD a month might someday make the difference between an empty house and a replacement-shopping spree.”

Sally Anderson “4 myths about renter’s insurance”

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Rental Forms

I am providing some Free Rental forms off of my site. I have collected these forms over the past few years from different places. Some from Friends others I have found on the internet just by searching. The rental forms on this page are all completely free for immediate use to assist you in landlord […]

I am providing some Free Rental forms off of my site. I have collected these forms over the past few years from different places. Some from Friends others I have found on the internet just by searching. The rental forms on this page are all completely free for immediate use to assist you in landlord and tenant situations. Just click on the DOWNLOAD link to get them. All forms are in Adobe Acrobat format unless noted.

One way that you can draw people to your rentals is to have Coupons, that is something that draws a renter to you. I do things like half off of the first month, or something that I noticed at another site, 13th month free. With the 13th month free, you will have a great draw to your places, if you have a high turnover, offer this if you have to evict the persons then you are not out any money.

Lead Paint Exposure (none of my properties have Lead Paint that I know of ), Here is some assistance that you should show your renters. [Lead Paint] and [Spanish](This free form is now required by HUD on all housing built before 1978. Landlords and real estate agents must disclose whether or not they have knowledge of the existence of any lead base paint hazards on the premises.)

Rental Application Form [Download] I like this application form, it is used by My Property Manager in Ohio.
Winterization Check list [Download]
Tenant Move Out Reminder [Download]
Tenant Check In Form [Download]
Early Rent Payment- Discount Voucher[Download]

Rent Receipts are easy you can create them yourself for Free, you dont need something from the store.Tenant Rent Receipts [RENT RECEIPT]

 

Other types of Landlord Rental Lease Agreement Forms will be added soon, When I get more time I will add them. Feel free to download the forms and come back and check to see what else I put up here.

NOTE:Not all forms are reliable or in full compliance with the laws in your state. The Agnus Dei Corp, recommends that you seek the advice of an attorney on legal matters. We hope that these forms will come in handy for you.

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Rental Listings in Ohio

Agnus Dei Corp Rents Homes in Youngstown Ohio and Struthers Ohio. The Rentals are provided on http://www.thelistingplace.com/ Please feel free to check out the availability of properties on this site. TheListingPlace.com has many other owner/operator properties that are not associated with Angus Dei Corp. At Agnus Dei Corp we strive to have the best properties […]

Agnus Dei Corp Rents Homes in Youngstown Ohio and Struthers Ohio. The Rentals are provided on http://www.thelistingplace.com/ Please feel free to check out the availability of properties on this site.
TheListingPlace.com has many other owner/operator properties that are not associated with Angus Dei Corp.

At Agnus Dei Corp we strive to have the best properties available for rent, we take pride in ownership.

COMING SOON: Trying to take applications online for your Rental? look no further, at Agnus Dei Corp, we are building a SaaS (Software-as-a-Solution) solution for us and for you. The solution keeps all separate companies separate but shares the renters history with each other, so when an application is submitted the receiver of the application knows if a partner company has evicted that applicant – a less expensive “credit check”. Currently the service will be free, we do plan on charging money – in the future.

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Most Common Questions about Applications as a landlord

Q. Why must I have a social security number to apply to rent a property? A. Your good credit history is the assurance that you provide the owner that you will be reliable in paying rent and caring for the property. That credit history is tied to your social security number. Q. What about someone […]

Q. Why must I have a social security number to apply to rent a property?

A. Your good credit history is the assurance that you provide the owner that you will be reliable in paying rent and caring for the property. That credit history is tied to your social security number.

Q. What about someone coming to work in the United States from another country for a specific assignment?

A. We have rented properties in such situations. Applicants may provide work papers, a passport, a contact from their originating country. Such applicants may be asked to pay a higher security deposit.

Q. Do you base acceptance of applicants on a specific FICO score?

A. No. Every tenant, like every property, is different. There may be reasons someone has a low FICO score while being an excellent prospective tenant. All criteria are taken into consideration and are presented to the owner of the property for approval.

Q. Will you rent to us even if we have a bankruptcy?

A. We are often able to work with people who have bankruptcies, depending on the date filed, status of filing, cause of the bankruptcy and credit history since the bankruptcy. If someone with a bankruptcy is approved, they are required to pay the maximum security deposit allowed by law.

Q. Why won’t you rent to someone who has been evicted?

A. The eviction process is lengthy and costly. There are times when a tenant suffers circumstances (or causes them) that cause them to need to leave a property (sudden inability to pay the rent, massive damage to the property, bringing pets to a no-pet property, etc). They always have the option of vacating the property prior to causing the legal process of unlawful detainer, better known as eviction. If a tenant remains in the property and forces the owner/landlord/property manager to go through the eviction process once, they are more likely to allow that to happen again.

Q. Why do you charge an application fee?

A. There are far more expenses incurred in processing an application that the application fee covers. The cost of running the credit report, obtaining the FICO score, checking past and present rental references and past and present employment references, checking for evictions, bankruptcies, judgments, liens, and even the validity of the social security number. Many reports have a hard cost, and making telephone calls and sending and receiving emails and faxes all take time and cost money.

Q. Do you accept more than one application for the same property at a time?

A. We will accept as many applications for the same property as people want to apply. We always disclose to anyone who is not the first applicant that we are already processing an application so that they may decide if they want to compete for the property. Many times there will be delays in processing an application because prior landlords or employers do not promptly return our calls. Another applicant may know they are qualified to rent and choose to apply, and sometimes the second or third applicant is approved and gets the house.

Q. What must I submit with my application?

A. All applications must be filled in completely. They must be submitted with the application fee, two recent pay stubs, proof of any other sources of income to be considered and current picture identification.

Q. What kinds of documentation could I submit with my application?

A. The more documentation you provide, the faster we will be able to process the application. We have accepted bank statements, legal documents, 1099s, tax returns, leases, cancelled rent checks, deeds of trust, mortgage statements, passports, etc.

Q. How can I apply if I live out of state or out of the country?

A. There are several ways. Before you do, however, make sure you qualify to rent the property of your choice. Compare your situation to our rental criteria. Then check with our office to make sure the property is not already rented. Download our application from our web site, fill it in and submit it:
by fax and pay the application fee via paypal
mail it with the application fee (slowest method)
scan it and email it and pay the application fee via paypal
bring the application and application fee to our office during working hours
drop the application and application fee off in the drop box of our office after hours for processing the next business day
send the application and application fee via courier, FedEx or other delivery service

Q. What if I submit an application and application fee and the property just rented?

A. We would refund the application fee in full. Fees paid via paypal would be reversed. Fees paid in person would be refunded by check once the payment has cleared.

Q. Why is an applicant only given 24 hours to bring in a security deposit to secure the property?

A. Often there is more than one person interested in a property, whether they have all applied or not. If someone is serious about renting a property, they will have the security deposit available for when they are approved. If someone is approved, and they do not come in for the appointment to sign the lease and pay the security deposit, we cannot hold the property for them.

Q. How often do you update your web site?

A. Rather than do time-based updates, we find it much more effective to do action-based updates. Usually within 24 hours of getting a new property, it is on our web site. Usually within 24 hours of renting a property, it is removed from our web site. The action is what causes the update. That way you can be assured that the properties listed on our web site are still available for rent and the rent amounts are accurate.

Q. I noticed one of your properties on some other web site, but it is not on your web site. Why not?

A. Some web sites like to add to their listings by copying listings from other web sites. The problem with that is that they are not updated nearly as often as we update our own site. A property we rented at 2pm will surely be removed from our web site by 3pm on the same day, but could possibly still be listed on one of those sites for another week or even longer.

Q. Why was I asked so many questions when I asked to see a property for rent?

A. We show our properties upon demand. That means tenants are not forced to wait until a pre-scheduled open house to see the property. In order to save everyone time, gas and money, we make sure that the people who want to see a particular property qualify to rent it. If you qualify to rent the property, we are happy to show it to you when you want to see it.

Q. Do you allow tenants to move from one of your properties to another?

A. We take it as an honor when an existing tenant desires to rent their next property from Horizon Properties. While we would require a new application for each person 18 years old and older, we would not charge an application fee. The security deposit, however, would have to be paid in advance, just as it would have to be on any new property. The fact that our properties are owned by individual owners makes it difficult to transfer security deposits from one property to another.

Q. Why do we need an appointment to sign the lease?

A. The lease is a legal contract between the tenant and the owner of the property. All the details of what is required when renting that particular property is included in that document. Time must be allowed to thoroughly read the entire contract and ask questions if any portion is not clear. Scheduling appointments allows us to make sure we provide the time you need and the attention you deserve when reviewing and signing this document.

Q. How long will it take to get my security deposit refund?

A. The closer to the original condition you leave the property, the faster we can process your refund. If we have to coordinate work to bring the property back into good condition because of damage or cleaning that is your responsibility, your refund will be delayed accordingly. If there is no work to be coordinated, the refund could be processed in a matter of days. This is also noted on your Lease contract, you must provide us with an address to send us your Security deposit.

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Lease Termination Notice Requirements

All rental agreements and leases should contain information about how much notice is required to terminate. This table shows the amount of time a landlord or a tenant needs to give ther other person in order to lawfully terminate a rental agreement or lease. The table also shows how much notice is required to raise […]

All rental agreements and leases should contain information about how much notice is required to terminate. This table shows the amount of time a landlord or a tenant needs to give ther other person in order to lawfully terminate a rental agreement or lease. The table also shows how much notice is required to raise the rent.

STATE TENANT LANDLORD STATUTE COMMENTS
Alabama 10 Days 10 Days Ala. Code §39-5-3 Notice required to increase rent No State Statue on the amount of notice required to increase rent
Alaska One month One Month Alaska Stat. § 34.03.290(b)
Arizona 30 Days 30 Days Ariz. Rev. Stat. Ann. §33.1375
California 30 Days 30 Days Cal. Civ. Codes 1946
Colorado 10 Days 10 Days Colo. Rev. Stat. §38-12-202 No State Statue in the amount of notice required to increase rent
Connecticut 1 Month 1 Month No Statue
Delaware 60 Days 60 Days Del Code Ann. Tit. 25, §5107
District of Columbia 30 Days 30 Days D. C. Code Ann. §45-1402
Florida 15 Days 15 Days Fla. Stat. Ann. §8357 No State Statue on the amount of notice required to increase the rent.
Georgia 30 Days 30 Days Ga. Code Ann. §47-7-7
Hawaii 28 Days 45 Days Haw. Rev. Stat. §521-71
Idaho 30 Days 30 Days Idaho Code §55-208 to increase rent or change tenancy Landlords must provide 15 days notice notice to increase rent
Illinois 30 Days 30 Days No Statue
Indiana 30 Days 30 Days Ind. Code Ann. § 32-7-1-3
Iowa 30 Days 30 Days Iowa Code Ann. § 562A.34
Kansas 30 Days 30 Days Kan.Stat.Ann. § 58-2570
Kentucky 30 Days 30 Days Ky.Rev.Stat. Ann § 383.695
Louisiana 10 Days 10 Days La.Civ.Code Ann.art.2686 No State Statue on the amount of notice required to increase rent
Maine 30 Days 30 Days Me.Rev.Stat.Ann.tit 14§6002
Maryland 30 Days 30 Days Md. Code Ann (Real Prop.) § 8-402
Massachusetts 30 Days 30 Days Mass. Gen.laws Ann.Ch.186 § 12
Michigan 30 Days 30 Days Mich.Comp. Laws Ann. § 554-134
Minnesota 30 Days 30 Days Minn.Stat.Ann.§ 504.06
Mississippi 30 Days 30 Days Miss.Code.Ann § 89-8-19
Missouri 30 Days 30 Days Mo. Ann.Stat.§ 441.060
Montana 30 Days 30 Days Mont.Code Ann. s 70-24-441
Nebraska 30 Days 30 Days Neb.Rev.Stat. § 76-1437
Nevada No Statue No Statue No Statue Landlords must provide 45 days notice to increase rent
New Hampshire 30 Days 30 Days N.H. Rev.Stat.Ann. § 540.3
New Jersey 30 Days 30 Days N.J. Stat. Ann §§ 46:8-10
New Mexico 30 Days 30 Days N.M. Stat Ann s 47-8-37
New York 30 Days 30 Days N.Y. (Gen Oblig.) Law § 232-b
North Carolina 7 Days 7 Days N.C. Gen. Stat § 42-14 No State Statue on the amount of notice required to increase rent
North Dakota 30 Days 30 Days N.D. Cent.Code § 47-16-15
Ohio 30 Days 30 Days Ohio rev.Code Ann § 5321.17
Oklahoma 30 Days 30 Days Okla. Stat. tit. 41§ 111
Oregon 30 Days 30 Days Or.Rev.Stat. § 91.060
Pennsylvania 30 Days 30 Days Pa.Stat. Ann. Tit 68 § 250.501
Rhode Island 30 Days 30 Days R.I. Gen. Laws § 34-18-37
South Carolina 30 Days 30 Days S.C. Code Ann § 27-40-770
South Dakota Mutual consent notice of parties Same S.D. Codified Laws Ann. § 43-32-22 Landlords must provide  one month’s notice to increase rent
Tennessee 30 Days 30 Days Tenn.code Ann. § 66-28-512 Landlords must provide 60 days notice to increase rent
Texas 30 Days 30 Days Tex.(Prop.)Code Ann § 91.001
Utah No Statue No Statue No Statue
Vermont 30 Days 30 Days Vt.Code Ann Tit. 9 § 4467.4456 Landlords must provide 60 days notice to increase rent
Virginia 30 Days 30 Days Va. Code Ann § 55-223
Washington 30 Days 30 Days Wash. Rev. Code Ann. § 59.04.020
West Virginia 30 Days 30 Days W.Va. Code §37-6-5
Wisconsin 28 Days 28 Days Wis.Stat. Ann.§ 704.19
Wyoming No Statue No Statue No Statue

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Tenants

What are my obligations as a tenant? As a tenant, you must meet the following obligations: Comply with the standards imposed by all state and local housing, health and safety codes. Refrain from and prevent family, friends or guests from damaging the rental premises. Keep the premises safe and sanitary. Keep plumbing fixtures in the dwelling unit as […]

What are my obligations as a tenant?
As a tenant, you must meet the following obligations:

  • Comply with the standards imposed by all state and local housing, health and safety codes.
  • Refrain from and prevent family, friends or guests from damaging the rental premises.
  • Keep the premises safe and sanitary.
  • Keep plumbing fixtures in the dwelling unit as clean as their condition permits.
  • Dispose of all garbage in a safe and sanitary manner.
  • Operate all electrical and plumbing fixtures properly.
  • When the rental agreement requires the landlord to supply appliances, you, the tenant, must keep such appliances in good working order by using them appropriately, keeping them clean and reporting malfunctions for repair.
  • Cause no disturbance and forbid family, friends and guests to disturb your neighbors.
  • Allow your landlord reasonable access (upon 24 hours’ notice) to the premises to inspect, make repairs, or show the property to prospective buyers or renters.  In cases in which you agree, in emergencies, or if the landlord needs to deliver large parcels, 24 hours’ notice is not required.
  • See that controlled substances (such as drugs) are not illegally used on the property.
  • Do not allow sexual predators to occupy the unit if the unit is located within 1,000 feet of a school, preschool or child daycare center.

The tenant cannot change any of these legal duties.

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